Thoughts on the election of 2010

In analysis by Bruce Kaskubar0 Comments

This piece was published in whole or in part by the Rochester Post-Bulletin, November 18, 2010, page A7. They gave it the headline, “Democrats had their chance to lead, and they blew it” which was not my choice and not my point. Many commentators have said that what happened on November 2 was just part of the usual swing of the political pendulum. I think not. In St. Paul, Republicans went from dismal minorities in both chambers of the legislature to majorities. The number of Republican Senators nearly doubled. Republicans will lead the state Senate for the first time in 38 years. About half of Minnesotans were not alive then. (Technically, that leadership is the first ever because the labels for office holders were then Conservative and Liberal.) …

A night to remember

In commentary by Bruce Kaskubar0 Comments

The nation’s and state’s Houses of Representatives came under control of Republican majorities. The state’s Senate did the same for the first time since 1972. Taking part in that shift were Rochester’s own Carla Nelson in senate district 30 and Mike Benson in house district 30B. Dave Senjem (29) and new-comer Duane Quam (29A) will be there, too. In Washington, we don’t get to revel in the change as Randy Demmer was unable to unseat big-spender Tim Walz. The off-party candidates did nothing but spoil. There will be a recount for Governor. Mark Dayton’s lead over Tom Emmer is razor thin. Emmer won in Olmsted county, 46% to 38%. All the DFL incumbents regained their constitutional offices. Mark Ritchie, in spite of the documented problems with the 2008 …

Election Judges

In analysis by Bruce Kaskubar0 Comments

Voting law in Minnesota is depressingly fraud enabling. Same-day registration. Vouching. Voting without ID. Voting with interpreter. Amazing. Our first effort at improving election honesty was to be sure we had plenty of Republicans applying to be election judges. We succeeded. In Olmsted county, we signed up over 100 applicants at the February precinct caucuses. Via other venues, we added dozens more. That’s the end of the good news. City election officials and township Boards make the election judge assignments, from the applicant pool. Applicants self-identify themselves in terms of political party. Precinct election judge staffing is supposed to include a balance based on political party. The city of Rochester has 45 precincts. The city gave us a copy of Rochester’s election judge assignments. About half our applicants …